Last edited by Shakora
Sunday, November 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Erasmus and Luther found in the catalog.

Erasmus and Luther

Rosemary Devonshire Jones

Erasmus and Luther

  • 400 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Oxford U.P. in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Erasmus, Desiderius, d. 1536.,
  • Luther, Martin, 1483-1546.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 91-93.

    Statementby R. Devonshire Jones.
    SeriesThe Clarendon biographies ;, 13
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBR350.E7 J58
    The Physical Object
    Pagination96 p.
    Number of Pages96
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5152664M
    LC Control Number74355482


Share this book
You might also like
Malaysian women today

Malaysian women today

The constables guide

The constables guide

microbe man

microbe man

Baba Prithvi Singh Azad, the legendary crusader

Baba Prithvi Singh Azad, the legendary crusader

Markov processes

Markov processes

New York Botanical Garden illustrated encyclopedia of horticulture.

New York Botanical Garden illustrated encyclopedia of horticulture.

Amending an act to establish and provide for the maintenance of a free public library and reading room in the District of Columbia.

Amending an act to establish and provide for the maintenance of a free public library and reading room in the District of Columbia.

Security and recognition

Security and recognition

Laboratory Diagnosis Of Blood-borne Parasitic Diseases, M15-a

Laboratory Diagnosis Of Blood-borne Parasitic Diseases, M15-a

Liquidity, monetary policy and financial intermediation

Liquidity, monetary policy and financial intermediation

Scottish art to the close of the nineteenth century.

Scottish art to the close of the nineteenth century.

Back to Methuselah

Back to Methuselah

big laughing book

big laughing book

The arithmetic theory of quadratic forms.

The arithmetic theory of quadratic forms.

Erasmus and Luther by Rosemary Devonshire Jones Download PDF EPUB FB2

In the first few years of Luther's career as a reformer, beginning inwith the publication of the 95 Theses, most of Europe perceived Erasmus as an ally of Luther.

Some, such as the papal legate, Jerome Aleander, thought Erasmus actually wrote Luther's works. Ininfluential friends, got Erasmus to write a tract against by: As a young friar in remote Wittenberg, Luther was initially a great admirer of Erasmus and his critique of the Catholic Church, but while Erasmus sought to reform that institution from within, Luther wanted a more radical transformation/5(51).

The Amazon description presents the book as a dual biography of Martin Luther and Desiderius Erasmus, but it also contains several biographical sketches of prominent figures like St.

Augustine, St. Paul, Thomas More, St. Jerome, St. Thomas Aquinas, Petrarch, Lorenzo Valla,/5. Erasmus and Luther: The Battle over Free Will edited by Clarence H.

Miller, translated by Clarence H. Miller and Peter Macardle. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, Summary: This work is a compilation of the argument between Erasmus and Luther over the place of /5. However, Luther — obdurate and reckless, bilious and doctrinaire — eventually swamps the book, as he eventually swamped the urbane and ironic man of letters.

The Christianity that Erasmus advocated — eschewing the finer points of metaphysics in favor of the humility, Author: Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. Luther and Erasmus. There are few men of the 15 th and 16 th centuries that deserve our attention more than Erasmus Desiderius of Rotterdam.

He represents the pinnacle of Christian humanism, an intellectual movement that revitalized classical and biblical scholarship north of the Alps.

Luther and Erasmus is a very important book on the history of the church. It includes Erasmus’ diatribe against Luther, De Libero Arbitrio (On the Freedom of the Will), and Luther’s response De Servo Arbitrio (On the Bondage of the Will).

This was an. The relationship between Luther and Erasmus was rich but stormy. The theologian and the humanist had very close understandings in their translations of the Bible. But they had different points of view on what could save individuals from sin and lead them on the path to salvation.

For Erasmus it. Erasmus was an internationalist Erasmus and Luther book sought to establish a borderless Christian union; Luther was a nationalist who appealed to the patriotism of the German people.

Where Erasmus wrote exclusively in Latin, Luther often used the vernacular, the better to reach the common man. Erasmus wanted to educate a learned caste; Luther, to evangelize the masses.

The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Erasmus and Luther: The Battle over Free Will by Erasmus and Luther book Macardle at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more.

Due to COVID, orders may be : Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. Library Journal Best Book of “Last year saw a profusion of books about Martin Luther to mark the th anniversary of his posting the 95 Theses.

Massing widens the lens wondrously, bringing in Erasmus, the great humanist foe of Luther, and showing how their rivalry set the course for much of Western : HarperCollins Publishers. Fatal Discord is surely the only book on either Erasmus or Luther that general readers will ever require.

It reads like a lively lecture series in that most beleaguered of university subjects, Western civilization."--Wall Street Journal "Michael Massing, a former executive editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, thinks these theological /5(40). Erasmus paves way for Luther Luther famously used the printing press to publish polemical tracts that attacked the church and called for changes.

The rapid and broad distribution of. Martin Luther used the second edition to translate the New Testament into German in Ulrich Zwingli visited Erasmus in Basel while the first edition was being printed, used his copy for most of his own preaching, and reckoned himself an Erasmian until his death in Criticism of the work came from many directions.

Review: The ‘Fatal Discord’ of Luther and Erasmus The rivalry between the humanist scholar and the reforming theologian gave rise to two enduring traditions in European thought.

In his catechism (entitled Explanation of the Apostles' Creed) (), Erasmus took a stand against Luther's teaching by asserting the unwritten Sacred Tradition as just as valid a source of revelation as the Bible, by enumerating the Deuterocanonical books in the canon of Alma mater: Queens' College, Cambridge, Collège.

This volume includes the texts of Erasmus's diatribe against Luther, De Libero Arbitrio, and Luther's violent counterattack, De Servo Arbitrio.

Gordon Rupp and Philip Watson offer commentary on these texts as well. Long recognized for the quality of its translations, introductions, explanatory notes, and indexes, the Library of Christian Classics provides scholars and students with 4/5(1).

Scholarship in Germany and the Netherlands --Desiderius Erasmus, the northern apostle of letters and reasonableness --The spiritual and political preparation for Luther --Martin Luther --Ferment and explosion --Luther's freeing of his spirit --The further expression of the man --Melanchthon and Zwingli.

"First Collier Books edition " Scholarship in Germany and the Netherlands -- Desiderius Erasmus, the northern apostle of letters and reasonableness -- The spiritual and political preparation for Luther -- Martin Luther -- Ferment and explosion -- Luther's freeing of his spirit -- The further expression of the man -- Melanchthon and ZwingliPages:   Both Erasmus and Luther wrote voluminously; Massing appears to have read and digested all of it and he does a brilliant job in transmitting his reading to us.

He also leavens his book Author: Peter Flom. Erasmus’ book by contrast is unworthy of one who, Luther concedes, is “a great man, adorned with many of God’s noblest gifts—wit, learning, and an almost miraculous eloquence” (BOW, p.

Desiderius Erasmus is not much more than a name and a book, The Praise of Folly, which is often appreciated more for its satire than its Luther is much more than a name, and more than a single book, too.

These two contemporaries, arguably more than any figures, ushered in the early modern era. Luther, Erasmus, and the Bondage of the Will (1) Certainly the single best-known work of Martin Luther is The Bondage of the Will.

This masterpiece deserves the honorable position it holds not only in the body of Luther's works, but also in the writings of all the Reformers.5/5(2).

Erasmus's enemies accused him of inspiring the schismatic Luther. And indeed, Erasmus found much he liked in the German's writings, describing him to Leo X as "a mighty trumpet of gospel truth.". THE contrast between Erasmus and Luther, between the would- be reformer of the Roman Catholic Church and the revolu- tionary founder of the Protestant Church, has been a matter of interest for four centuries and will continue to be so, inasmuch as the two men were types of permanently opposing tendencies.

Murray's new study of the subject, in a learned and thought- ful book, is directed mainly. New York Times Notable Book of Library Journal Best Book of “Last year saw a profusion of books about Martin Luther to mark the th anniversary of his posting the 95 Theses.

Massing widens the lens wondrously, bringing in Erasmus, the great humanist foe of Luther, and showing how their rivalry set the course for much of Western civilization.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Jones, Rosemary Devonshire. Erasmus and Luther. London, Oxford U.P., (OCoLC) Named Person. In the first few years of Luther's career as a reformer, beginning inwith the publication of the 95 Theses, most of Europe perceived Erasmus as an ally of Luther.

Some, such as the papal legate, Jerome Aleander, thought Erasmus actually wrote Luther's works. Ininfluential friends, got Erasmus to write a tract against by:   Erasmus’s Handbook of a Christian Knight provided such guidance by rejecting rituals and rites.

Central to the bitter debate that followed between him and Luther would be the question of free. Erasmus lived against the backdrop of the growing European religious Reformation, but while he was critical of the abuses within the Catholic church and called for reform, he kept his distance from Luther and Melanchthon and continued to recognize the authority of the pope, emphasizing a middle path with a deep respect for traditional faith.

Desiderius Erasmus is considered one of the greatest minds in history; he was a humanist scholar, a theologian, a writer, a teacher, and, as he put it, "a citizen of the world." His reputation during his lifetime reached the loftiest heights and sunk to unexpected lows during the Lutheran crisis.

His published texts and numerous letters figure. For his part, Luther wrote to Erasmus in and urged him, “Please remain now what you have always professed yourself desirous of being: a mere spectator of our tragedy.” It was not to be. Erasmus had chosen his point of attack: the very issue that Luther hinted at in He released a short book titled De Libero Arbitrio (On Free Will.

Massing argues that the schools of thought represented by Erasmus and Luther—a pluralistic humanism and an evangelical religion, respectively—still shape Western religious and political.

In two instances Luther refers to Erasmus as "stupid" and Erasmus states Luther is "without reason." This makes for a more interesting read but also shows the limits of each man's patience. This book may not be for everyone, but those desiring to know more about the debate of the Catholic Church will find it has much to offer/5(5).

Each scene comes alive with real people. The interesting history holds the reader to the end. Erasmus and Luther come alive in Fatal Discord. The concluding summaries bring the history forward and the balance between the assesments of both Erasmus and Luther illustrate how accessible this whole book is for the modern reader/5(41).

Luther and Erasmus: Free Will and Salvation Translated by E. Gordon Rupp In andseven years after Martin Luther began the Reformation, Erasmus of Rotterdam (–) and Luther held a “debate” in print entitled On Free Will and Salvation.

Erasmus initiated this exchange in the form of an open letter in early New York Times Notable Book of Library Journal Best Book of “Last year saw a profusion of books about Martin Luther to mark the th anniversary of his posting the 95 Theses.

Massing widens the lens wondrously, bringing in Erasmus, the great humanist foe of Luther, and showing how their rivalry set the course for much of Western civilization. In On the Freedom of the Will, Erasmus offers his opinion on the concept of freedom of choice (or free will) with respect to religious doctrine.

Martin Luther Martin Luther was a German theologian. Comprising Erasmus's "The Free Will" and Luther's "The Bondage of the Will," Discourse on Free Will is a landmark text in the history of Protestantism.

Encapsulating the perspective on free will of two of the most important figures in the history of Christianity, it remains to this day a Pages: Zuber via United States: Softcover, ISBN Publisher: Continuum, New. DISCOURSE ON FREE WILL: ERASMUS & LUTHER **BRAND NEW**. Free Shipping On All Domestic Orders Home About View All Products Contact DISCOURSE ON FREE WILL: ERASMUS & LUTHER **BRAND NEW** DISCOURSE ON FREE WILL: ERASMUS & LUTHER **BRAND NEW** Item specifics ISBN Author: Desiderius Erasmus /5().

Library Journal Best Book of “Last year saw a profusion of books about Martin Luther to mark the th anniversary of his posting the 95 Theses. Massing widens the lens wondrously, bringing in Erasmus, the great humanist foe of Luther, and showing how their rivalry set the course for much of Western civilization.

But Eamon Duffy, in his review of my book Fatal Discord, goes a step further [NYR, April 18]. He spends his first twenty- six paragraphs (filling more than two pages in the Review) summarizing my account of the rivalry between Erasmus and Luther.

There’s hardly a fact in those paragraphs that does not appear in my book.Erasmus was the second illegitimate son of Roger Gerard, a priest, and Margaret, a physician’s daughter.

He advanced as far as the third-highest class at the chapter school of St. Lebuin’s in Deventer. One of his teachers, Jan Synthen, was a humanist, as was the headmaster, Alexander Hegius.

The schoolboy Erasmus was clever enough to write.